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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/17/2017 2:42:13 PM
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Platinum
Not immediately but soonish
The zero-day exploit problem will be getting worse because it doesn't demand a high level of skill among malicious hackers; just lots of cheap space and time (both of which keep getting cheaper) and some simple brute-force methods.  Defending against it demands smarter systems over time, as the more subtle and clever exploits are discovered, and eventually you'll need a backstop realtime monitor that can say "This fits the general category of things that probably shouldn't be happening" to do your sandbox routing -- which is going to be an AI job.  No need right now -- but the industry will probably get burned a couple of times before they decide the time has come to put AI on the job.

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clrmoney
clrmoney
11/17/2017 3:07:56 PM
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Platinum
Cybersecurity Trade Offs
I know that cybersecurity is something that is very needed when you are dealing with things online like when you want protections fron online criminals or hackers. I think that it may be more expensive depending on what you want secured that something that is minor but I know that only time will tell.

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Kishore Jethanandani
Kishore Jethanandani
11/17/2017 3:12:18 PM
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Author
Re: Not immediately but soonish
<<The zero-day exploit problem will be getting worse because it doesn't demand a high level of skill among malicious hackers; just lots of cheap space and time (both of which keep getting cheaper) and some simple brute-force methods>> I am surprised by this comment from you, @John Barnes. I wrote an article earlier about this topic and the challenge is that these exploits don't have signatures, they target specific vulnerabilities that have not been patched, which should surely require a lot of skill to pinpoint. AI is also not working against them because there isn't enough data on them to train the AI engine. I am not sure what your point is.  

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afwriter
afwriter
11/17/2017 4:26:36 PM
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Platinum
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
Cost will be a factor in the future but as the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of the cure. 

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Ariella
Ariella
11/18/2017 6:53:56 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@afwrtier very true; that's why it pays to be proactive.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/18/2017 6:53:57 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@afwrtier very true; that's why it pays to be proactive.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
11/19/2017 10:34:31 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure -- so minimizing your attack surface seems like a more cost effective strategy than trying to develop superhuman AI to outwit attackers. That makes sense to me.

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Kishore Jethanandani
Kishore Jethanandani
11/19/2017 12:33:13 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@mhhf1ve: It does make sense. The question is whether it is possible to achieve zero-defect software given the volumes that are generated. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
11/19/2017 5:13:01 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
Maybe it's more cost effective to develop AI that can minimize defects by identifying bugs before they're deployed?

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
11/19/2017 5:43:00 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
As I reflected upon your thought, what was bothersome was the title--about trade offs--There should be no compromise on security--right?

 

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