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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/3/2016 5:52:33 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Curious...
I'm wondering how people generally define "connected car" technology? Is it vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle to infrastructrure (V2I) communications that allow for smart traffic algorithms and autonomous transportation? Or are we talking more along the lines of passengers watching Netflix while going from A to B? (Or both?)

Or is there something even more? Will connected car tech allow for a revolution in shipping and delivery services? Is it the broader effects beyond just having cars wirelessly connected that makes people predict that connected cars will be more important than IoT health services? 

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afwriter
afwriter
6/3/2016 10:34:00 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Curious...
@mhhf1ve My first thought is V2V and total automation, but I think everything that you bring up would fall under that blanket.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/5/2016 9:11:59 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Curious...
@mhhf1ve  My preference and initial thought is the ability for vehicles to have access to apps, such as Pandora and Netflix. My biggest concern would be losing the signal, particurlarly on longer drives, where I would find the access more useful. Total automation honestly scares me. But I'm a bit of a control freak. What if someone created some kind of virus to override the total automation that would send the cars careening out of control? To be honest, I'm not the biggest fan of the idea of V2V either - it would worry me that other cars could get access to my most traveled routes, times and what not. People are crazy these days, road rage is already out of control. We don't need to give people with no rationale more information. 

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afwriter
afwriter
6/3/2016 10:35:48 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Nervous Nelly
The tech junkie in me LOVES these ideas, but the possibility of interference from hackers, broken connections, or even nature makes me super nervous. 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
6/6/2016 2:18:40 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nervous Nelly
What about this--this should potentially horrify us all?

Google's Art Machine Just Wrote Its First Song


google magenta music

What it is: Can machines create art? According to Google, yes -- its Magenta program, announced last week at Moogfest, has already composed a 90-second piano melody. The composition was created with a trained neural network built on top of the open-source TensorFlow system.

Why it's important: Google wants to build an artists' community around machine-generated art, and Magenta is the first step to building generative systems that musicians and artists can use as part of their natural creation process

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
6/7/2016 8:57:42 AM
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Author
Re: Nervous Nelly
@afwriter: I'm with you, man.  Google "Satis smart toilet" and "hacked".  That's one attack I would not like to be on the receiving -- ahem -- end on.

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Michelle
Michelle
6/7/2016 12:58:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nervous Nelly
@Joe I didn't even have to add 'hack' to my search term. Articles about the hacked smart toilets were among the top results! Scary stuff for sure. 

Related: O.T. The Outside Toilet (Bob's Burgers)

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/4/2016 9:11:27 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Connected Car Oh My!
There's no doubt why a connected car would be the heavy favorite. Especially if it could receive more signal than current capabilities. (I just spent about 50+ hours on the road with two toddlers - streaming Netflix for them and Pandora for my husband and I would have been a sanity saver!) Obviously, security would be a necessary measure, and everyone would want a fairly steady stream, no matter where they drove. I'm sure these would initially be problems, but would hope they could be ironed out. It's likely a long time coming, but one can dream, right?

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Owner85593
Owner85593
6/6/2016 3:09:09 AM
User Rank
Silver
Re: Connected Car Oh My!
With every car having a xm radio why do they not find a way to transmitted a signal needed so that we can get updates on the weather and traffic and listen to Pandora. The need for more information when going on the road seem to get bigger every day. The cost of customer using their cellphone data will need to be better so it will not cost the customer more than they need to pay for the use of service on the road.

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clrmoney
clrmoney
6/4/2016 11:21:07 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Connected Car
What the the connected car really has to offer I was shocked by this but I guess with technolgy it can cnect certain deviced that can contaol the car but still I'm not sure they should be in the league.

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batye
batye
6/5/2016 3:15:23 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Connected Car
@clrmoney it way of new future we are living in it now... Internet of things

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clrmoney
clrmoney
6/6/2016 11:10:53 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Smart Cities
I thinnk smart cars should be in the lead considering that you can connect and use mobile devices for your home etc.

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DHagar
DHagar
6/7/2016 2:48:17 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Smart Cities
@clrmoney, interesting perspective.  You may be right - they both are also consumer-driven industries that truly link the consumer with industry.

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afwriter
afwriter
6/6/2016 3:10:20 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Tesla
I was lucky enough to get to see a Tesla in person this weekend and it was ridiculously cool.  The guy showed me how you can back up your car from your phone; talk about connected car. 

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Ariella
Ariella
6/6/2016 5:20:45 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Tesla
@afwriter Wow! On the one hand, that's cool. On the other, I'd be concerned about securing the connection so that if someone gets his hands on your phone, he can't take over the control of your car.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/8/2016 6:01:32 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
@Ariella - Given the price you pay for a Tesla, one would hope they have security of the car figured out. Though I suppose you can never be too sure. That is definitely a scary thought - bad enough that someone could decide to run you off the road, or whatever other kind of road rage they want to throw at you. This could open a whole new panel on road rage.

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Ariella
Ariella
6/8/2016 8:56:01 AM
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Author
Re: Tesla
@elizabethv They have been hacked by researched, as presented in Wired last year: https://www.wired.com/2015/08/researchers-hacked-model-s-teslas-already/ Tesla did come up with a patch, but that's not quite the same thing as proving the car to be hack-proof. However, the article did point out the at the vulnerabilities in that case were not as bad as those in the infamous Jeep hack. 

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Michelle
Michelle
6/8/2016 2:39:19 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
@Ariella all the research into smart vehicle security vulnerabilites make it easy to buy a dumb car. Indeed, lesser security issues does not equal better or hack-proof. Car makers have a lot to prove in future iterations. I can't imagine how older infotainment systems are maintained (if at all).

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Ariella
Ariella
6/8/2016 2:42:44 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Tesla
< Car makers have a lot to prove in future iterations> @Michelle, I couldn't agree more. Last fall I wrote, A Wakeup Call for the Connected Car Industry in which I said, "In the rush to embrace the connected car as an inducement to people to trade up to the very latest technology on the road, carmakers failed on due diligence." 

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Michelle
Michelle
6/9/2016 10:43:21 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
@Ariella thanks for sharing your article!

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batye
batye
6/13/2016 4:47:59 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
@Ariella thank you for the link interesting reading, good to know.... thanks

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/15/2016 6:45:33 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
> "In the rush to embrace the connected car ..., carmakers failed on due diligence.."

Automakers seem to have really dropped the ball when it comes to security, but it's not that surprising given that the auto industry is more accustomed to multi-year upgrade cycles -- not zero-day exploits.

But as more and more appliances and Things get connected, every manufacturer is going to need to have a security and upgrade/patch strategy for how to prevent malicious attacks. Maybe it seems silly to need a firewall for your dishwasher, but no one wants to be surprised by what unintended actions a dishwasher can make at 3am when someone on the other side of the world figures out he can make a dishwasher generate enough steam to explode.....

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Ariella
Ariella
6/15/2016 8:57:43 PM
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Author
Re: Tesla
<Maybe it seems silly to need a firewall for your dishwasher, but no one wants to be surprised by what unintended actions a dishwasher can make at 3am when someone on the other side of the world figures out he can make a dishwasher generate enough steam to explode.....>

@mhhf1ve or even rig it to flood your home when you'll be gone for days and return to permanently damaged floors, carpets, and furniture. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/15/2016 9:24:31 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
RE: "..unintended actions a dishwasher can make.."

Yes, I'm highly skeptical of connected appliances right now. Maybe in the distant future when all connected devices are updated with a secure blockchain network, and there's at least some assurance that the possibility of invisible Gremlins trashing everything is negligible.

But currently, I'm not even that confident that my Windows PC isn't infected with malware.. so I'm not about to trust a refrigerator that can connect to the internet to be running up-to-date anti-virus software. Or anything with a heating element... 

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Ariella
Ariella
6/15/2016 9:52:29 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Tesla
@mhhf1ve I'm with you on that. I'd rather not be an early adopter. I'm not even sure I'd be a later adopter of smart fridge. But even for connected cars etc., I would like to be reassured that the vulnerabilities have been addressed and resolved -- at least for the most part, as nothing is perfectly invulnerable. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/15/2016 10:51:22 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
> 'But even for connected cars etc., I would like to be reassured.."

Heh. Well, that said, most "connected cars" today aren't really that connected. And I'd probably drive/own a Tesla Model 3 if given the chance. Despite all the coverage of Tesla drivers getting into trouble with semi-autonmous features, I think Tesla's over-the-air updates are probably fairly secure -- because I can't imagine Elon Mush wouldn't be paranoid about malware getting into his cars? Musk is worred about "evil" artificial intelligence, so as a nano-manager, I'd assume he'd tell his engineers to keep things as secure as they could.... 

And there just aren't that many Tesla vehicles out on the roads for bad guys to reverse engineer for an attack.. so there's at least some security-by-obscurity. :P

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Ariella
Ariella
6/16/2016 9:14:56 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Tesla
< security-by-obscurity. :P> @mhhf1ve indeed. I'm not altogether paranoid. When my insurance offered that I put one of those Octo telematics sensors into my car for 3 months, I agreed. I did warn them, though, that I don't drive a lot, so they won't get a substantial amount of data. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/16/2016 10:39:26 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
For auto insurance, a small amount of data for your driving habits that confirms you don't drive much is good for your insurer! That means fewer chances to get into an accident. They'd probably love it if no one drove at all but still paid their premiums....

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Ariella
Ariella
6/16/2016 11:29:29 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Tesla
@mhhf1ve well, it's an interesting thing about the way it was explained to me. I was told that the discount could be as high as 30% but that it would depend on getting enough driving data in. With only a little bit of driving data uploaded due to driving very locally and not every day, I was told that the discount likely would be smaller, though I was assured it can't go up. They are most interested in patterns for abrupt braking. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
6/16/2016 3:03:14 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
Interesting.. I've never used one of those trackers.. so.. if you do "brake abruptly" -- what happens? Do they send you a warning first? Do they remove your "discount" immediately? It seems a bit out of your control if you HAVE to brake abruptly to avoid someone else... but I suppose if it happens every time you drive, then it's probably not other drivers.

Tesla cars already have trackers built into their cars, but they're not feeding that data back to insurance companies (yet?).. So far, it looks like Tesla uses the data to help train its self-driving algorithms -- and defend itself from owners who try to blame their own carelessness on Tesla.

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Ariella
Ariella
6/16/2016 3:25:45 PM
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Author
Re: Tesla
@mhhf1ve There is some kind of dashboard that is supposed to be accessible over the web. In truth, I haven't looked at it. It's really more for the insurance to get data on your driving habits than for your own edification. As you said, a single abrupt braking incident does not necessarily reflect one's skills, but a pattern could. That's why they prefer to get more driving data to form the a comprehensive picture. But I'm not going out of my way just to clock more miles on the sensor. 

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DHagar
DHagar
6/7/2016 2:52:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tesla
@afwriter, that is cool!  I bet that set an entirely new high standard for you.  As those "smart" capabilities are available in various car models, it would be hard to see "connected" and "smart technologies"not  becoming widespread luxury options, if not standard.

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