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dlr5288
dlr5288
1/31/2017 9:48:24 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
Yeah it's crazy how much data they use. I had no idea! My households uses 30 GB monthly for our cellular data.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
1/24/2017 8:36:35 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
@JohnBarnes - I would think even the teams with the smaller budgets can try to compete where technology is concerned, even if they can't compete in getting the most expensive players or coaches. It could almost truly level the playing field. As a born and raised Yankees fan I've heard it so many times that their success comes from their money (they aren't really living up to that lately....) And there is probably already a little more technology being used in baseball than other sports, because the opportunities already exist. (Being able to see not only the speed, but the trajectory of the ball when pitched, the stance of the batter, the actual swing itself.) But if all teams can get and use this information equally, the Yankees (and other big spending teams) would lose some ground.

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freehe
freehe
1/23/2017 10:51:57 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
@Adi, good points. Thanks for sharing. Data can definitely help both types of sports analyst.

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freehe
freehe
1/23/2017 10:41:50 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Formula One Data
Wow, that is amazing that Formula One uses so much data. I had no idea they were that data heavy.

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
1/22/2017 10:13:09 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
@afwriter - I think Formula One offers an opportunity to use data more than other sports do. My sister-in-law works for Pratt Whitney and does diagnostics on jet engines, with a computer. I'm sure Forumla One Race Cars use just as much technology to make them the best they can be, and computers are the best way to find out where improvements can be made. Maybe it doesn't seem obvious up front, but it definitely makes sense. You can't hook your Quarterback up to a computer to find out what you can tweak to increase his performance. 

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Adi
Adi
1/16/2017 8:25:36 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
dcawrey - I think a lot of teams are spending on collecting and analyzing data. Video analytics are becoming more important, as you will see on many post-match analysis shows. We have more number on who touched the ball, number and percentage or passes made and completed, heat maps etc. - all new to sports coverage. 

I also think sports is one of those areas where you have people who are more intuitive, and do best when they just go for it (James Hunt, Ayrton Senna), and there are others who are more analytical (Niki Lauda, Alain Prost) and find the data more valuable. Convincing more analytical people (not just playesr, but also managers, coaches) of the benefits of data is easy, but the more intutive folks take a little longer to get on board. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/15/2017 6:10:31 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
afwriter,

Well, if the average household had millions of dollars in media rights and licensing riding on its performance, you can bet they'd be collecting 10 gig about their weekend activities too.  ("How'd the cookout go? We've got three million dollars riding on that, I want to know every detail of every hamburger we bought, cooked, and served, second by second!")

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/15/2017 6:06:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
dcawrey,

Moneyball -- the account of how the Oakland Athletics manage to be a top team on a small budget -- is a good place to see where this is happening in MLB. And several teams in the NBA are using big data tactics -- notably the Golden State Warriors who saw the potential of the three pointer (and built an offense around it, finding the amazing Steph Curry on the way) and the San Antonio Spurs, who have worked out a great deal about the economics of a no-star teamwork-based offense and manage to succeed with a much smaller talent budget than most teams.

The real lesson from this, though, is don't look for innovation from people who are getting rich following the conventional wisdom. Big data/advanced analytics is finding its way into sports in franchises that don't have much to spend and still want to stay competitive; that's the way with innovation.  (Compare with military history, where it is a truism that the side losing a war is much more likely to try to deploy futuristic weapons than the side winning; or evolutionary theory, where the population being forced out into unfavorable niches is where the really different innovations crop up).

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dcawrey
dcawrey
1/15/2017 12:30:56 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Data Data Data Oh My
I have been hearing how data-centric F1 has been for years. It makes me wonder: Why don't other sports follow suit? Yes, I understand how mechanical a sport like F1 is. But what about the NFL or NBA? I would think they could gain a lot by gathering more data about players in the games through monitoring. 

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