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clrmoney
clrmoney
3/1/2018 3:12:13 PM
User Rank
Platinum
China 5G Plans
I'm not surprise about China wanting to be on theri own because we get many things from china like clothes shoes etc. I'm sure that with them getting 5G they will be more adavned of doing things and using it to make it valuable for themselves as well as others.

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afwriter
afwriter
3/3/2018 12:32:17 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Understatement
Ambitious is an understatement. I wonder what happens to the company if these plans don't work out? I can't imagine that they are so far ahead of every other company that there are not at least a few risks involved here. 

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batye
batye
3/4/2018 6:26:50 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
@afwriter yes lots of risk involve but rewards is very great  at the end the way it look...

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
3/4/2018 11:04:12 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
Part of leadership is about anticipating and engaging--that's the key-They seem to understand this--although others are not willing to tag along.

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batye
batye
3/5/2018 1:54:13 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
@mpouraryan it depends how you look at it but in my mind ledership should be right and engage right people to do it right.... brining ideas and people as one... as technology should united people to do right things... 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
3/6/2018 6:49:54 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
Exactly. There's almost no risk if they get to test out their tech ahead of others in a real-world environment -- and work out the bugs before global competition can. Then it's only a question of making sure it doesn't get blocked from the US market because of security concerns..... 

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Ariella
Ariella
3/7/2018 10:04:25 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Understatement
@mhhf1ve They do claim security concerns, but economic concerns also seem to be an influence in the policy. That's what the WSJ article, Why Washington Is So Obsessed With China's Huawei seems to indicate:

Major American wireless carriers, such as AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc.,have said they are initially focusing 5G coverage in a few cities. "What I see in the U.S. is wireless carriers choosing particular geographic markets for 5G," said Gartner Inc. analyst Ian Keene. "The way the Chinese are going to approach it, it's going to be blanketed."

The extent to which the U.S. government shares that fear was laid bare in unusual clarity in the CFIUS letter. The committee said it would probe whether a Broadcom-Qualcomm tie-up would "leave an opening for China to expand its influence on the 5G standard setting process." It cited specifically Huawei's 5G "engagement."

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
3/8/2018 6:51:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
> "They do claim security concerns, but economic concerns also seem to be an influence in the policy."

In this day and age, economic concerns *are* effectively security concerns. When economic collapses happen, it can lead to political unrest and government failure. I can just imagine that China and Russia were analyzing our Great Recession to see how resilient our economy was in 2009. If a similar economic panic and failure could be engineered, it would be "easy" to cause the fall of the US government -- especially if there's already political unrest. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
3/6/2018 6:48:09 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
Is there really a big risk here? I assume there's a captive market of sorts. How much competition is there in wireless carriers in the market that China Mobile is planning to deploy its 5G service? 

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vnewman
vnewman
3/7/2018 3:53:22 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
With China Mobile being largely owned and controlled by the Chinese government - what happens if these "ambitiious" 5G plans fail?  Will the rest of the world ever even know?

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
3/8/2018 3:03:37 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Understatement
@vnewman: Well, you can't hide a dropped call. ;)

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
3/8/2018 6:46:11 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
> "Will the rest of the world ever even know?"

Failure might not last long. If there's enough funding and resources to keep pushing a Chinese version of 5G.. it will ultimately "succeed" by some measure. By the time other countries hear about a failure, the deployment might be on track to exceeding any other country's "success" even as a failure. 

There are supposedly some "ghost towns" in China, built from central planning failures. But does that take away from the successes in other cities? 

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Michelle
Michelle
3/31/2018 11:57:27 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
Very interesting! I hadn't read about planning failure ghost towns. I suspect other countries would be in the dark about any failures in China for quite some time.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
4/5/2018 4:40:00 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
The "ghost towns" in China have been reported in several places. It's perhaps too early to say if these places are complete failures? I think a few of them have been used as movie sets as a backdrop for post apocalyptic plotlines.... 

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Michelle
Michelle
4/9/2018 2:49:22 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
I guess that's as good a use as any. I wonder if they have any kind of connectivity with cell towers... I would think coverage is a plus if you want to attract even more film projects.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
3/12/2018 2:57:38 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
Classically, that's one of the rationales for any government-backed economic operation: it's too important to fail and too risky for private capital, and very often both of those factors are rooted in sheer size, in scarcity of resources, in urgency, or some combination of all three.  Take classic "big government" projects in the US and they mostly fit that model -- the transcontinental railroad, the atom bomb, the moon shot, interstate highways, the big dams in the TVA and BPA, the B-29 bomber, the International Space Station, the St. Lawrence Seaway, even the Brooklyn Bridge and the Golden Gate.  At a reasonable guess, in the intensely managed Chinese economy, the government sees gaining an early lead in G5 as vital, and handed the job of making it happen to China Mobile.  The calculus now is no longer "bang for buck" but "quickest and surest way to acceptable outcome." 

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DHagar
DHagar
3/12/2018 6:44:35 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Understatement
@JohnBarnes, very true!  But also very important is that it becoms a public asset, providing regional infrastructure.  Also, that it remains a shared asset that can support multiple users as opposed to a single dominating player that could profit from it.

Interestingly, it also appears today that you need more  public/private partnerships, due to the fact that there are still inadequate resources to pay for the costs (with limited public funding), and that private industry is needed to provide the capital to overcome the risks involved in the development of new infrastructure that is moving public/private enterprises into a new future - where there is financial risk.

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srufolo1
srufolo1
3/12/2018 10:06:36 AM
User Rank
Platinum
China Mobile Stands Alone in Ambitious 5G Plans
Once again, China seems to be taking the lead in 5G technology with the announcement of its commercial standalone 5G network at MWC. I'm actually surprised China Mobile was so forthcoming in its plan, as, yes, what if it is a complete failure? 

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