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elizabethv
elizabethv
2/28/2018 10:58:57 PM
User Rank
Platinum
5G
I would be interested to know what the trials consisted of eniterly. Perhaps they used various aspects of 5G technology, and that's why the specifics are lacking somewhat. I'm curious if they completed a phone call also, or were they more along the line of app useage. I think phone calls could definitely stand to use an increase in technology more than a few other types of functionality. I like to think I'm satisfied with current internet communication speeds, but I also would imagine in about a decade I'll look back on today's technology similar to the way I currently look back on AOL-type technology. 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
2/28/2018 10:54:06 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G
@srufolo1 - I hope the future of trains in America is a little brighter than the picture you paint. I recently moved to a more remote area of Colorado, but I've been told there is a bullet train coming within a few years that will allow people to get from the airport to a nearby town in 15 minutes. Realistically the idea kind of scares me. And I've been on the train that takes you from London to Paris through the Chunnel. So why it scares me, I'm not so sure. 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/27/2018 10:28:48 PM
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Author
Re: 5G
@srufolo: Eh, you're speaking to one who prefers driving. I'll still take public transit as reasonable, but it's just awful here (some particular trains/lines more than others) -- made worse by the fact that a lot of the Big Dig debt was transferred to the MBTA (the authority that runs the trains, subway, and buses in the Boston area), making improvements requiring capital expenditures quite few and far between.

(And that's to say nothing of, ahem, allegations of long-standing rampant corruption and incompetence.)

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/27/2018 10:22:09 PM
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Author
Re: 5G
@afwriter: Indeed, different strokes for different folks. A lot of people prefer the train/bus/etc. because of the concentration demanded -- and stress resulting -- from driving. A lot of people prefer driving as a matter of independence.

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srufolo1
srufolo1
2/26/2018 11:13:14 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G
@Joe Stanganelli Yes, Americans, ever the rational thinkers. It's also that the train system in Europe is the most popular way to travel across countries, and it's been perfected for comfort, speed and convenience. Here in the U.S., you can't even get from Long Island to Manhattan without some kind of problem, such as long delays, etc ... Our infrastructure, quite frankly, su-ks. Half the time, we can't even keep the train on the track! And nobody ever appears to want to do anything about the problem, except finger-point. It's a pleasure to take trains in Europe that slice through mountainsides and offer views of cows with tinkling bells in the Swiss countryside. Here, we take a train (or not) just for the drudgery of getting to work or whatever the reason. Therefore, we Americans prefer to be miserable in private.

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afwriter
afwriter
2/26/2018 11:13:01 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G
@Joe In my personal experience, I love my car and don't really like being without it but after experiencing life in big city Europe I don't think I would have a car there. I actually quite enjoyed being on the train and not having the responsibility of driving. 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/26/2018 10:12:57 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: 5G
@srufolo: The train systems are more advanced in other nations because Americans simply don't like mass transit/taking trains.

There was a recent report about Uber and other ride-sharing services having led to a boom in traffic congestion. The unwritten part of the report was that the reason for this is that many people stateside -- far more individualistically minded than their European counterparts -- would rather sit in their own personal car in bad traffic than sit in a bustling train car even if the latter were faster.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/26/2018 10:10:13 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: 5G in Germany
Well, being the first to innovate something and venture into newer territory is genuinely going to take longer and be a harder journey. Besides, Intel is a manufacturer and not a network operator (like Vodafone). The partnerships matter too.

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afwriter
afwriter
2/23/2018 1:14:26 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Interoperability
There is so much to take from this short post but I think the most important thing to note is the importance of Interoperability in technology moving forward. The telco business has changed and will continue to change and working together is speeding along new developments. 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
2/22/2018 11:44:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G
@freehe You're right. I traveled throughout Europe in the early '80s and I felt like I was on another planet. Switzerland had high-tech cafeteria-type restaurants, and everything seemed like it was run on advanced technology. Even the train system was more advanced. It appeared the citizens of some of those Northern European countries were onto some kind of secret, because they appeared to be living a much better lifestyle than we were in the U.S. And it's probably more that way now than ever.

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