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dlr5288
dlr5288
1/31/2018 7:37:04 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: B2B
Another great point you bring up is how 5G will be financially suitable for many people. Thatís one of the things that was so difficult. Getting a good price, not only for companies, but consumers as well. For as many people to enjoy 5G as possible.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
1/31/2018 7:35:22 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G Embrace Cloud
The one thing Iím looking forward to most with 5G is how far it will be able to reach. So the connection can truly be spread over mostly everywhere!

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freehe
freehe
1/23/2018 9:44:06 PM
User Rank
Platinum
B2B
The article didn't mention specifically how "new opportuniites will be in the B2B, B2B2 and B2G areas". That would be interesting to know.

5G providing low latency services will be great including increased uptime, scalability, affordabiity and responsiveness.

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freehe
freehe
1/23/2018 9:37:11 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
@mhhf1ve. Good point. However I don't think 5G will solve all capacity and bandwith problems but will be a good start. With AI, cloud services and IoT there will need to be other solutions developed to process, stream, analyze and track the large amount of data that will be generated and accessed using 5G.

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freehe
freehe
1/23/2018 9:34:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 5G Embrace Cloud
5G will provide greater capacity and reduce latency. 5G will be able to implemented in rural or underserved areas. 5G will help gather multiple networks on one platform, provide uninterrupted connectivity worldwide, support more connections, and should be manageable with previous versions such as 4G and 4G LTE.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
1/11/2018 6:37:44 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
But even if AI bots were "quieter" -- it might be much easier to clone a TuringTestWinning bot than to raise a kid. So perhaps AI souls will also outnumber us quickly, too.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/11/2018 6:08:17 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
mhhf1ve,

There's a secondary effect there that I think is even larger: to produce the same amount of human-read message, an AI moves vastly more data around through vastly more steps.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
1/11/2018 12:52:51 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
> "Machines are going to be better than people at everything -- including hogging bandwidth!"

This will undoubtedly be true. M2M communications will likely grow far beyond the traffic that us mere humans can generate. We can just look at the rate of content generation now to see that machines will outpace us easily when it comes to data production. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/10/2018 2:19:43 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
mhhf1ve,

Wow, I hadn't thought of that but you are obviously right. especially considering current directions in big data and data science.  Deep learning/machine learning in real time -- the sort of thing that will be needed to take full advantage of the widespread use of autonomous vehicles, immediate response logistics nets, all sorts of big rapid-response systems from games to financial markets -- are going to be gigantic high-speed data pigs with ever-increasing appetites.  Even if we reach the point where every human being is getting as much data as s/he can or wants to absorb, improvements in products, services, and quality of life delivered via data and processing from the cloud are going to keep pushing the demand higher and higher for generations. 

Machines are going to be better than people at everything -- including hogging bandwidth!

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/9/2018 3:07:36 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I wonder about surge capacity
Kishore,

Certainly there's a market for quickly assemblable ad hoc networks, and so we'll be getting more, bigger, more flexible, and all around better ad hoc networks from the market. And I don't doubt that they will greatly alleviate and forestall surge capacity problems.

As I see it, there are three flies in that particular ointment:

1. The tendency for surge capacity to become base capacity over time (as mhhf1ve and I were batting around; ad hoc networks are likely to be so useful for everything from tourist-attracting events to flu outbreaks to handling rush hours to big shopping days that the resources used in the ad hoc networks will always be moving into everyday use.

2. Basic result in market economics -- entities with the average v. surge problem do build some overcapacity; monopolies build less overcapacity than less concentrated markets do. So the tendency of the cloud to concentrate resources (and thus keep them in use) is likely to aggravate things.

3. And by the same token, as there get to be a very large number of businesses that are just reselling cloud services, it may not be visibie how few resources there actually are, so we might not notice before something goes blooey.

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