Contributors   |   Messages   |   Polls   |   Resources   |  
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 4 / 5   >   >>
freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 6:31:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Paramount launches 3D on your head
@Ariella, Those are valid points. The side effects are a huge problems for VR users. Some expeirence headaches, balance problems and and stomach issues. The price cannot be higher than the cost of going to the movie theater or they will lose the market they are trying to capture.

50%
50%
freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 6:28:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Infrastructure
This will only be successful in an adequate infrastructure is in place and will require high broadband speeds as well as 5G. Without improvements in the current infrastructure they will be lag time, latency problems, buffering and a less than high quality experience for VR users.

 

50%
50%
freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 6:27:02 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Paramount and Sports
"Paramount is not the first to use VR to replicate the theater experience. It's been tried for the Superbowl by Fox in the US and for selected games from the NBA, the FA Cup and the English Premier League by BT Sport in the UK. Hulu is probably the first company to offer this experience on an ongoing basis via its VR app."

Sports team owners will definitely fight back against VR for sports ticket holders. I enjoy attending live sporting events.

Attendees can listen to music from the live DJ, can interact with other fans, buy food and drinks, watch the game on the screen and on the floor, listen to the analysts live.

Those experiences can never be replaced by VR.

50%
50%
freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 6:23:32 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Movie Theater AR
"Hollywood [in the past] focused on the theatrical release. So it's trying to protect it. They find it very scary that people can now just skip their traditional channel where they have spent decades building up a strong position."

According to Zee, virtual reality is a potential game changer for the world of cinema. "Yes, you have theaters and cinemas but now you can enjoy a potentially better experience in your own home with VR," he says. "Millennials are lazier, less interested in theaters."

Technology does not replace the human experience of going to the movie theater. I love going to the movie theaters and listening to people provide their feedback during the movies, buying popcorn and deciding which seat to sit it. All this will be lost by using VR.

This experience will only work if the user has a high broadband speed, there are no buffering issues, the sound levels must be the same as the movie theater and the large screen used must be of high quality.

In this instance I support Hollywood in keeping the theatrical release.

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
11/23/2017 2:41:07 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: I'm there
<Watching movies at home on the couch is like people trying to read together in stadium. >

@JohnBarnes hmmm, we do think of reading as a solitary activity, but people do read on their own in a kind of a crowd environment in library reading rooms. Also schools have tried to encourage reading by making some time for it in a classroom setting. I think it's not so hard to lose yourself in a book even when you're surrounded by people. I do it when I take a train.

50%
50%
JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/23/2017 1:47:49 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I'm there
Ariella, I think that's not so much an introvert v extrovert thing as its just the technology driving another swing of the pendulum in the long (at least 600 years in the West) alternation of audience protocols. One view imagines that watching a performed narrative should be like reading, i.e a single artist creates a single totally controlled vision which a viewer receives without noise or interruption. The other view thinks it should be like a popular music concert or a sports event, where a crowd of coordinated performers work together through a shared creative process in front of a crowd that is responding(and interacting with each other) in realtime with the performance. The first group invented arm rests, directional lighting, screen writing formulas, auteur directors, and telling that idiot behind you to shut up. The second invented bleachers and cheap seats, standing ovations, improv, call and response worship, midnight premieres, ensembles, and the star system. They satisfy different artistic needs, usually in the same person at different times and in different circumstances. At various times in performance history the tech has made one or other pole easier to get to, and the culture tends to deliver the easier one. Watching movies at home on the couch is like people trying to read together in stadium.

50%
50%
elizabethv
elizabethv
11/23/2017 9:12:54 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The end of the beginning
@Shaunn - I completely agree, going to the movies definitely has become an intrinsic part of our culture. We will be taking our middle son to his first movie in a few weeks, we picked the movie "Ferdinand" for his first movie a few months ago, and I've been excited ever since. We created the tradition of taking our kids to their first movie around their 3rd birthday, and it comes out a week before his 3rd birthday. But it also perfectly fits his personality, because he is such a bull in a China shop, but he has a heart of gold. It's aspects like this, and you mentioned, that make movies such an important part of our culture. VR has a very long way to go before it can compete on that level. But then, movies became a part of our culture, largely because of the Great Depression. There could be some kind of economical, or sociological aspect of our culture that might spur VR further. 

50%
50%
Shaunn
Shaunn
11/22/2017 8:12:31 PM
User Rank
Platinum
The end of the beginning
Movie theaters have some pretty deep cultural roots. Popcorn, snacks, sound, and company play a big role in a good movie theater expirience. VR and AR have a long way to go in order to compete with that; TV may have killed radio, but its spirit still lives on in radio (and podcasts and satellite radio and Spotify).

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
11/21/2017 8:35:58 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: I'm there
@JohnBarnes You may enjoy Laurie Helgo's book Introvert Power. She describes how much she enjoys going to movies by herself, particularly in the middle of the day when she might be the only one sitting in the theater. 

50%
50%
elizabethv
elizabethv
11/21/2017 7:39:52 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Paramount launches 3D on your head
Ariella - I agree with you on most counts. It holds potential, and they need to get over the headset issue. But I don't know that people would pay a hefty fee, unless maybe the experience is amazing. I suppose if they can pull off some kind of unforgetable experience, make it on par or better with a movie theater. Then I suppose people would pay the price. I see the headset as a big barrier though. They're going to have to address either making it comfortable, lighter, some sembelence of both - or smaller. Maybe take some kind of queue from the Anglerfish? 

50%
50%
<<   <   Page 4 / 5   >   >>


Latest Articles
Italy's 5G auction could exceed a government target of raising 2.5 billion ($2.9 billion) after attracting interest from companies outside the mobile market.
The emerging-markets operator is focusing on the humdrum business of connectivity and keeping quiet about some of its ill-fated 'digitalization' efforts.
Three UK has picked Huawei over existing radio access network suppliers Nokia and Samsung to build its 5G network.
Vendor says that it's its biggest 5G deal to date.
Verizon skates where the puck is going by waiting for standards-based 5G devices to launch its mobile service in 2019.
On-the-Air Thursdays Digital Audio
Orange has been one of the leading proponents of SDN and NFV. In this Telco Transformation radio show, Orange's John Isch provides some perspective on his company's NFV/SDN journey.
Special Huawei Video
10/16/2017
Huawei Network Transformation Seminar
The adoption of virtualization technology and cloud architectures by telecom network operators is now well underway but there is still a long way to go before the transition to an era of Network Functions Cloudification (NFC) is complete.
Video
The Small Cell Forum's CEO Sue Monahan says that small cells will be crucial for indoor 5G coverage, but challenges around business models, siting ...
People, strategy, a strong technology roadmap and new business processes are the key underpinnings of Telstra's digital transformation, COO Robyn ...
Eric Bozich, vice president of products and marketing at CenturyLink, talks about the challenges and opportunities of integrating Level 3 into ...
Epsilon's Mark Daley, director of digital strategy and business development, talks about digital transformation from a wholesale service provider ...
Bill Walker, CenturyLink's director of network architecture, shares his insights on why training isn't enough for IT employees and traditional ...
All Videos
Telco Transformation
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS
Copyright © 2019 Light Reading, part of Informa Tech,
a division of Informa PLC. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Terms of Use
in partnership with