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freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 10:22:37 PM
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Platinum
SDN and Security
More companies are moving towards using SDN which is great. SDN makes it easier for companies to implement security meaures and migrate security risks. This is greatly needed given the number of reported data breaches that occur as well as the number of data breaches that are not reported.

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freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 10:20:32 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Using open software
I see why more companies are moving towards using open software since it is easier to secure than closed software. The more people that monitor open software the more opportunities to find security risks. With closed software companies assume vendors will have enough security measures in place so that they don't have to monitor security risks. When a security incident occurs everyone points the finger at each other. Open source avoid these types of issues

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freehe
freehe
11/23/2017 10:17:01 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Cybersecurity Trade-Offs
I am not surprised that AI for cybersecurity is not viable. Cybersecurity is huge like IoT and uses a lot of resources. Since the best way to battle threats is to test them at every level more companies need to do that unfortunately they don't.

I currently work as a tester and always look for hidden problems that the average tester would not look for to reduce risks, defects and security issues.

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Kishore Jethanandani
Kishore Jethanandani
11/20/2017 10:55:27 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@JohnBarnes: With due respect, neither wars nor germs achieve a static equilibrium. In wars, attackers want more and more territory, or in our times, more and more influence. Similarly, infections wrought by germs grow over time. Either the body fights back or the germs grow. So, we are back to square one. We don't know the achievable outcome and must keep looking. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/20/2017 10:11:27 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
Ariella & Kishore,

I think we're probably headed for a situation something like the relationship between germs and immune systems, or international balance of power; we have to give up on the idea of perfect security and move on to "tolerably imperfect security," in which a certain number of (non-fatal) breaches or (controlled) wars and insurrections are just expected and tolerated. How business will live with an imperfect-partial-security system, coexisting with ineradicable-but-not dominant cybercrime, I have no idea. But I think that is where we will end up, like it or not; I see no way for either side of the legitimacy line to either win a permanent victory or just go away.

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Kishore Jethanandani
Kishore Jethanandani
11/20/2017 7:05:44 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@Ariella: IOT expands the sprawl and the number of intersection points. It is hard to make the rules as fast the technology is evolving. Now you have this new 5G phenomenon which increases the numbers of the antennas at the edge and that will only increase the vulnerabilities. No one really knows who is supposed to go where at these crossroads so the adversaries find more ways to deceive and move around with impunity. Hence the need to have zero-defect software to start with.  

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Ariella
Ariella
11/20/2017 6:33:44 PM
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Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@Kishore sounds pretty pessimistic to me. It sounds like these are some of the same problems we are encountering with "smart" devices and IoT in general.

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Kishore Jethanandani
Kishore Jethanandani
11/20/2017 5:38:50 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@Ariella: Great question to ask. The AI tools that have been implemented so far have all been bummed. Worse, they are being attacked so they are actually on the defense. Some new tools have arrived on the scene which John alluded to and one I discussed in my article on cybersecurity that looks promising. But you never know what next the adversaries do. So far, they have consistently outmaneuvered the defenses. The fact that they are becoming polymorphic will likely be a huge problem for any AI engine. 

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Ariella
Ariella
11/20/2017 9:30:53 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Cybersecurity Trade Offs
@Kishore You're not optimistic about the ability of AI to make businesses more efficient?

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/20/2017 7:56:05 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not immediately but soonish
Kishore Jethanandani,

There's a good analogy to a modern burglar -- who has to be alert to where security cameras can (and can't or probably won't) be, motion detectors, etc. -- but after using the knowledge and skill to get to a door or a window, he's still just picking a simple lock, using a stolen key, or breaking something with a crowbar, and the plan once he gets inside is just to head for the most likely places for valuable stuff, load up fast, and leave.

Unfortunately in the software world there's much more he can do; in a way it's fortunate that there are still abundant rewards for the relatively dumb and lazy (but still good at evading security) thief, because otherwise the potentially smart and creative ones would be motivated to do  "better" work.

Sidenote for forward-thinking security people: every time you come up with a really improved set of barriers that cuts down your security problem ... you are creating a bigger prize for the smarter bad guys.

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