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Michelle
Michelle
11/5/2017 4:49:02 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Support & service
It sounds like the pirate boxes could use an upgrade to function better for customers. I wonder if they'll consider it or just keep with the current model. It could make a great sitcom... bad guys make pirate boxes, then have to provide good customer service to keep customers from leaving.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/3/2017 3:00:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Watching the defectives
Ariella, "The internet perceives censorship as damage, and wires around it" -- truism since before I was on the net (which was about 1987).  

The government of China -- with officially nearly unlimited power and a geographic isolation nearly as good as Australia's -- can't completely keep the unfettered web out.  Good luck to the Aussies, I guess ... maybe they can call it Project Canute.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/3/2017 2:42:11 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Piracy is Killing
batye,

I don't see how a legal solution would work anyway, because fundamentally people don't tolerate harsh laws against things that they don't think are wrong. That's what doomed Prohibition and the sodomy laws in the United States, anti-contraception laws in Ireland, stage and film censorship in the UK, etc. Furthermore it isn't practical to jail or fine really large numbers of people, again, especially not if they think the law is silly.

And most people think most forms of IP law are silly (possibly because so much of IP law is silly). It doesn't really matter how much public education is put into it, people see no particular harm in a day care center decorated with unlicensed paintings of Disney characters, a music enthusiast putting up a thousand protected videos on YouTube or other services, or people writing and circulating their own stories about Batman or Buffy the Vampire Slayer. They aren't going to see, at the most fundamental level, why they should be punished for just getting all the lacrosse and squash they want for $10 per month.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/3/2017 2:37:33 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Watching the defectives
@JohnBarnes a quick search shows that some countries are trying to ban the sites altogether, as here: https://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-and-other-pirate-sites-will-be-blocked-in-australia-161215/

But there are workarounds for things like that for people who know how to set up access from an IP address located outside their country. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
11/3/2017 2:25:01 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Watching the defectives
Ariella,

Good luck on that one .... most of the payments online for illegal goods and services (gambling, drugs, prostitution, weapons, false certificates and licenses) are paid for via legal, aboveground credit or debit accounts, usually with no more cutout than someone buying a debit/gift card as simple anonymizer. So, for that matter, are huge amounts of live-in-person goods and services that are illegal in the jurisdiction where they're being sold.  Banks, service providers, and card companies are not going to give up all that income stream, and given their actual power and influence, no one is going to try to make them.

A pervasive very small scale purely property crime is not going to tip the balance toward piercing the network and identifying and prosecuting cardholders. 

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dmendyk
dmendyk
11/3/2017 1:36:36 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Watching the defectives
Agree -- when a problem is serious enough, the entity with the problem finds a solution (or at least tries to find one). Theft of service has been an issue for decades. Mostly, the response has been best-effort (or maybe that's least-effort) solutions.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/3/2017 12:18:18 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Watching the defectives
Aren't people who subscribe to illegal sites also considered to be breaking the law? If they do so with credit cards -- as is nearly always the case for online services -- they are easily traceable. There must not be much of a crackdown for so many people to leave such a clear trail.

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batye
batye
11/3/2017 12:04:57 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Piracy is Killing
@clrmoney the laws do exist against piracy but not all countries use them... plus it also depends on the country legal system... as people get away with slap on the wrist in Canada for example... 

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dmendyk
dmendyk
11/3/2017 11:39:35 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Watching the defectives
It sounds like closer monitoring of user bandwidth activity might help operators figure out where the pirates be.

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clrmoney
clrmoney
11/3/2017 10:47:59 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Piracy is Killing
I think that they should have something to block people from doing piracy because it hurts business. Because Sandvine is losing billions of dollars they all get advanced security for this.

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