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clrmoney
clrmoney
10/2/2017 10:50:10 AM
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Channel 4
I think this will be interesting for channel 4 to see what the future holds because I think they will make a lot of progress with what they have to offer for a targeted audience.

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Adi
Adi
10/4/2017 5:22:35 AM
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Re: Channel 4
clrmoney - certainly signs of progress. 16 million registered users is no mean feat in a country of 65 million. The brand helps -- its a major broadcaster in the UK. And also the fact that it is free. The world drama initiative (Walter Presents) is also a good one, as some of the shows are really good, they are just from various countries you don't see that much programming usually -- like Belgium, Argentina, Brazil. 

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afwriter
afwriter
10/2/2017 4:20:55 PM
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Copy and Paste
"The user interface has been updated this year, and offers some new features. It prompts viewers who were watching a show previously to continue with it, provides reminders when new episodes of shows you have viewed previously become available and provides personalized, algorithm-driven recommendations."

So basically what Netflix has been doing for years?

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Adi
Adi
10/4/2017 5:18:57 AM
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Re: Copy and Paste
afwriter -- Probably, but Netflix is way ahead of a lot of broadcasters in terms of personalization and UI development. That's one of the reasons I feel if you aren't Netflix or Amazon, the general interest entertainment category is going to be tough to break into. All 4 has the advanatge of being part of a major broadcast network, with hit shows, so it can stand out to some extent. But if you try this on your own, it's very difficult because the "Big Two" are so far ahead. 

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afwriter
afwriter
10/5/2017 11:01:44 PM
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Re: Copy and Paste
@Adi, probably true, but I think that Netflix is about to stumble. They are raising their prices, losing Disney, and putting a little too much into original programming in my opinion. Maybe now is the time for some of the other smaller providers to grab their piece of the pie. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 2:09:47 AM
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Re: Copy and Paste
Netflix might stumble, but it has a pretty big lead now. It would be difficult for a startup to get the same distribution network and quality content pipeline going. Perhaps a hybrid pirate-legal content service could skip to obtaining a large enough library of quality content. But the demise of Aereo suggests that an approach like that would be killed by the court system.

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Michelle
Michelle
10/5/2017 11:12:04 PM
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Re: Copy and Paste
Don't forget the backend technology that politely buffers content in the background. I think Netflix has done well for lower bandwidth situations. They've done what the other two cannot. 

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afwriter
afwriter
10/2/2017 4:22:20 PM
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Be careful when moving people's cheese.
I think that what Channel Four is doing is not only smart but essential. That being said it needs to be done carefully. Hulu just had a big UI change and almost everyone I know including myself hates it.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/4/2017 9:06:34 PM
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Why nine is a puzzling thing for Milton to talk that way about...
Modern AI and machine learning, especially for big data, relies on segmentation methods, and nearly all segmentation methods have some better-than-most-others numbers of segments. The short almost certainly true is answer is "because the algorithm told us to use it."  The slightly longer answer might be "the compactness criterion of the segments went through minima at four, nine, twenty-eight, and forty-nine, and nine was the most precise one we could afford to administer."

I suppose it's conceivable that they really just pulled "nine" out of thin air and then tidied up everything via k-means, but that would be sort of a perverse solution unless there was something really odd that forced them to it.

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/4/2017 9:19:48 PM
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There's a math for taste-stretching, but it isn't easy
Taste-stretching is a really interesting problem in recommendation algorithms and I think we'll hearing much more about it. Some dimensions more stretchy than others (Westerners, for example, are much stretchier about what kind of bread a sandwich is made of than they are about what kinds of meat can be in it; pita, naan, or tortillas instead of hamburger buns are a small stretch, whereas guinea pig, opossum, or eel instead of beef, pork, or tuna are big stretches).  Some dimensions are measured and ordered (weight, thickness, speed, etc), some are ordered but not measured  (mild, medium, spicy, hot, WATER NOW!), and some are distinct but not ordered (colors), and that doesn't even touch all the other things like continua (length) versus binary (sleeves or not), and so forth.  Somehow you have to locate something as complicated as programming in all those  dimensions and then consider how much people like to move, and along which dimensions, in what combinations.  The result is to say, "What's going to be the least resisted suggestion once we properly weight and combine tropical, Romantic, green, Tuesday, rigorous, iconic, and thin crust?"

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/4/2017 9:46:45 PM
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A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
You can find the homepage for All 4 at http://www.channel4.com/.

I assume the "hero" of which Miller speaks is the 6 large panels in a 2x3 array at the top; then there's a large separated array of smaller panels extending well below the screen edge.

One of the big panels is an ad, and ad-supported TV being what it must be, that will probably always be true. So that leaves 5 more positions, and presumably 5 big items to promote can be slotted into 5 positions in 240 ways (math keyword, permutation).  But if you're addressing different groups, there's no point in offering one group ABCDE and another ABCED -- they're too much alike, and the extra effort to customize that small difference is probably not worth it (especially since you also have to maintain a research base to determine exactly how many of each group have what preferences between the tiny rearrangements. 

So you want to maximize the difference between permutations. One way to do that is to say "no leading pairs" (i.e. first two in the order) "that are reverses of each other" (i.e. if one sequence begins AB, there can't be another one that begins BA. For nine combinations, following that rule, you could use:

A B _ _ _

B C _ _ _

C D _ _ _

D E _ _ _

E A _ _ _

B D _ _ _

C E _ _ _

D A _ _ _

E B _  _ _

The remaining _ _ _ can be filled with triples, no two alike, and you can impose other conditions to keep them from being too similar. Interestingly, the possible number of unique pairs (i.e. no two pairs are reverses) is only 10, and if you had 10 you would be forced to use a much less diverse group of triples than you would with any number below it.  So 9 is the maximum diversity for a hero with 5 slots. (Assuming heros are basicaly just rearrangements, rather than completely different from each other -- and that's probably true-ish, as popularity of shows falls off so rapidly once you get out of the top few).

 

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dcawrey
dcawrey
10/5/2017 12:28:11 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Discovery is really important. I think it could use major improvements, and we're nowhere close. I'm still spending a lot of time trying to find things that are interesting to watch.

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Michelle
Michelle
10/5/2017 11:09:30 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Agree 1000%! Have you used Hulu's Roku app yet? It's one of the worst around. Discovery is a clear focus but at all other costs. It's poorly done.

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afwriter
afwriter
10/5/2017 11:09:49 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I think the boom in original content is actually making that harder too because not only are their so many more options, many which are for niche audiences, but we don't get time in between shows to discover anything new. It's just "here's ten more originals for you to binge."

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/7/2017 4:15:43 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Discovery is an interesting problem in AI attempts to model preferences.  We know people generally like the same things for a while and then satiate, and when you're talking about whole populations, even the satiation rate is fairly predictable.

Most discovery relating to taste is of things that are "the same only different," and there are not yet clear ways for the machine to discover and predict either "how different is just different enough?" or to identify what has to stay the same and what has to differ.

Nonetheless I think it's a soluble problem.  The thing is, the information needed to solve it is probably not in Netflix or Amazon's datasets; it's probably in other companies' datasets. There's room here for some highly effective customer aggregator to break into (and maybe even take over) this market.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/7/2017 6:00:03 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I think we'll find that discovery isn't really the problem we think it is. Netflix has already figured this out after its million dollar challenge to improve recommendations. Netflix didn't end up using the algorithms because the more profitable business is not in better recommendations-- but in pushing viewers to more cost effective content (sneakily).

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/7/2017 7:08:46 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
mhhf1ve,

True for some cases (emphatically including Netflix) -- but in other cases there's also attrition to worry about, and discovery is one of the ways to beat attrition. (To some point; on the third hand (the prehensile tail?) there are fields like pop music where attrition is absolutely built into it, and better discovery for younger people only leads to older people finding out they're out of touch faster).

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 12:42:08 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Certainly. Not every streaming content service is the same. Netflix has its own business model that favors recommending titles that they own and content they have favorably negotiated deals to offer to subscribers. Redbox and other "blockbuster" delivery networks have similar incentives. It's only certain content aggregators (Amazon?) that have large libraries of content that aren't well known that do well with discovery algorithms that point people to obscure titles.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/8/2017 1:09:31 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Yes, Amazon is the almost-polar case I'm thinking of.  Google/YouTube could easily move into that space as well if they have a mind to.

And the part of my brain that is never far from the possible frontiers in data science/big data/forecasting has begun to think "in principle ... why couldn't an algoorithm forecast when a person was about to get bored with a narrow repeated niche and start to want something new?" Then the same service could keep both the happy rut-sitters and the jaded rut-jumpers on board, seamlessly.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 2:05:29 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
YouTube is definitely a content delivery service that benefits from strong discovery algorithms. The nature of its "long tail" content makes it perfect for discovery algorithms to do well. But even then, humans aren't so complex -- and I'd guess fairly simple algorithms would do pretty well without resorting to exotic deep learning. Merely suggesting content that other people have watched multiple times is enough to be a decent algorithm for discovery. I do wonder occasionally if any YouTube algorithms have ever "started" a viral hit? If YouTube could "manufacture" viral videos -- that would be an interesting achievement.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/8/2017 5:45:46 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
mhhf1ve,

And at this point, a not-yet-answerable question.  It may be like rainmaking, i.e. you can't make a cloud rain unless it's already ready to; or like forest fires (you can almost always start one but if it's wet and cold enough it won't sustain; or even genuinely an "any one any time" kind of thing. But the information is just not there.

And you're quite right that a simple cheap-to-run algorithm with a tolerable level of mistakes may make better economic sense than a highly developed one; that's another one of those problems they make you solve in data science class over and over and over and over ....

 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 9:43:01 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Heh. I thought NASA figured out how to make a rain cloud -- but it was just way too expensive to do on a large enough scale to be practically useful. China figured this out too when it tried to wash away air pollution before the Beijing Olympic Games a few years back.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 2:14:34 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Every content service has to worry about attrition -- but the gamble then is to produce new content more frequently. E-sports and other live events are probably the most cost effective content for preventing attrition-- which is why ESPN has been the linchpin for channel bundles until recently. Twitch and other e-sport networks will probably be the next growth phase for OTT video services. I think there's just gotta be an upper limit to scripted dramas....?

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/8/2017 5:20:00 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
mhhf1ve,

It could be a pretty high limit. In the 19th century a resident playwright at a theater -- and most theaters had at least one -- was usually contracted for 10-20 scripts a year.  Actors put shows up on 2 rehearsals for the most part, rehearsing in the mornings and on afternoons when there wasn't a matinee.  Theaters were open 6 days a week, pretty much round the clock, with new sets being put up on Monday morning, rehearsed on for Monday afternoon, previewed Monday, opening Tuesday, with no breaks. Multiply that by there having been at least one live theater in any town in Europe or America with more than 50,000 inhabitants  and you end up with what we have -- maybe 100,000 to 250,000 produced scripts per year between about 1800 and 1890 in the Western theatre.  That's just the full length ones that ran about 2 hours, so with entr'actes, curtain raisers, nightcaps, and other short features, it's easily half a million hours of scripted performance.

And all that was produced by a much smaller, less educated population that didn't have word processors.

More recently, the numbers are also huge for pulp fiction magazines between the wars, radio before WW2, comic books for the Code, movies 1910-40, early local television ...

There does have to be an upper bound to how much scripted entertainment can be produced, granted, but it's not clear that anyone ever even got close to it. And with the ability to replay recorded versions, the upper bound may actually be a bound to consumption rather than production.

 

 

 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 9:36:31 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Sure, there's no theoretical limit to how much content *could* be produced-- but there's certainly a limit on how much people can consume. I'd guess something like I more than 20% of a country's GDP is equivalent to the consumption of content by humans? Maybe if we create AI that can appreciate art then there will be no limit to content consumption besides the energy content of our solar system. :P

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/8/2017 9:45:04 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
There have been a few attempts to make an AI that can compose hit songs and/or symphonies. Maybe we'll soon be flooded with more music than we could ever possibly listen to! (If we're not there already).

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 9:20:40 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
<.It now has 16 million registered viewers, with a heavy skew towards 16-34-year-olds.>

@Adi I'm curious about the categorization. Is there really a huge category that takes in that range of ages, or does that combine three iedifferent categories, say 16-22, 23-29, 30-34?  

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 11:38:30 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Hmm. Do you really think for a viewing audience that a 16-34 age bracket is large? I've seen it before as a demographic group. But maybe for other surveys, like retail, more divisions are better for capturing preferences of younger audiences.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 11:43:31 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve I have a 16 year-old, and I gather her taste would be distinct from someone in their early thirties, likely even different from someone in her twenties. It's a different stage of life being in high school than beind post-college. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 11:57:15 AM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I completely understand that a high school kid has different tastes than a person in their early 30s but in terms of purchasing power those two age brackets might not be so different. Given the number of young adults who live with their parents after college, the under 35 crowd is probably single and childless-- which is mostly what that demographic bracket for advertising cares about.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 12:10:07 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
< completely understand that a high school kid has different tastes than a person in their early 30s but in terms of purchasing power those two age brackets might not be so different.>

I certainly hope that people will be earning more in their 30s than they are when 16, particularly as their eaning time is limited by being in school full time. One other difference is the ability to enter into binding contracts, which only kicks in at 18, and the fact that many credit cards are now wary of granting credit to anyone under 21 without a parental partner.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 12:47:46 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
The incomes of 16yo kids and 30-somethings should be different-- but the amount of discretionary spending power might not be too different?

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 12:55:49 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve that all depends on if their parents provide them with money, and some do that even for their children in their thirties! At 16, my daughter's earnings are limited to her summer camp job, which pays about $1k, and her babysitting jobs, which can amount to more than that. But we're still talking under $3K for the year. I suppose, you can argue that it is all disposable income. Perhaps, but I still think she'd spend that amount differently in her thirties than she does now.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 1:43:58 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Heh. Check back in another 16years and see if your daughter is still spending about $3000 or less on entertainment per year? Given how many millennials share passwords for Netflix -- it doesn't strike me as outrageous to think that 30-somethings might not spend a whole lot on unnecessary things (besides avocado toast)....

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 1:48:39 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve Aside from her devices, her biggest purchases have been a camera and lens. Right now she's interested in photography, but unless she decides to turn the hobby into a source of income, she likely it will not dominate her spending in future.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 2:51:02 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I think camera equipment will become cheaper and cheaper too. I'm not sure how long big DSLRs will be around for non-pros. The Light L16 camera looks like the wave of the future for digital cameras.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 2:54:19 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve or Apple phones may bump cameras out. Daughter tells me that some photographers shoot only on iPhone and get some amazing pictures.

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afwriter
afwriter
10/9/2017 3:26:56 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I think there are certain camera tricks that phones will never be able to do, but for the most part, I think you're right. If you're not a nature photographer phones will be the future. Some independent filmmakers have even experimented with filming movies on their phones already. 

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 4:06:07 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
<Some independent filmmakers have even experimented with filming movies on their phones already. > @afwriter Yes, the advances in the camera quality made that possible a couple of years ago. And, as daughter reports, the iPhone camera gets better and better.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 4:18:00 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
The iPhone camera is probably better than most users even realize. And with newer computational photography that stitches multiple photos together, smartphone cameras are getting better than some professional SLR cameras.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 4:30:01 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
<And with newer computational photography that stitches multiple photos together, smartphone cameras are getting better than some professional SLR cameras. > Indeed, it is the feature that may one day tempt me over to the dark side.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 5:03:15 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I'm not sure how digital photography is the "dark side" -- is a manual SLR somehow akin to the Jedi? Does anyone use film anymore?

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 5:51:11 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Nothing against digital, some reservations about Apple.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 7:06:18 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Apple's iPhone camera is apparently not that much different than flagship Android phones. So if you don't like iPhones, try a Pixel2? Arguably, Android is getting better than the iPhone cameras when it comes to post-processing.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 7:59:28 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve That's possible, though I don't know if they've thougt of an ad campaign that says, "Shot on an Android" to rival this: https://9to5mac.com/2017/08/07/instagram-apple-shot-on-iphone/ 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 8:18:18 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Some Android users have a head start with hashtags.

https://www.reddit.com/r/GooglePixel/comments/5oiapz/what_is_the_main_hashtag_for_photos_shot_on_the/

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 9:37:34 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve I like #pixelperfect, but I'm not sure it will ring Android bells for people who aren't already into it. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 10:04:12 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I'm not sure why people are so proud of the equipment maker used to take a photo. I guess I'm just not that into photography to care about the hardware brands.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 10:31:11 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@mhhf1ve I suppose it's like anything that makes people feel particularly attached to a brand that has worked out well for them.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 10:35:27 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
It's interesting how Apple has found itself on the same side of an analogous PC-Mac war for mobile platforms.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
10/15/2017 2:45:53 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@Ariella, I have the new Samsung S8 and it takes a REALLY GOOD picture. Picture enough for me anyway. So personally, ads don't really concern me. Performance does.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/15/2017 7:56:37 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
@elizabethv I agree with you. That's the tech equivalent of the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 3:01:12 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
And when camera equipment gets a lot cheaper, there will be an ever longer tail of YouTube-like content.....

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 4:07:40 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
<And when camera equipment gets a lot cheaper, there will be an ever longer tail of YouTube-like content.....> @mhhf11ve there's a downside to evverything. Yes, we do have a lot of content out there, but lots of it should probably never have been put out in public view.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 4:13:33 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
No one will ever be able to watch all of the videos on YouTube, but then again, there's little reason to even try. The vast majority of YouTube videos are worthless and/or boring. But every so often there are some good viral videos and how-to videos on topics that would never get a high production value. Recently, I learned how to fix my garage door from a YouTube video...

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afwriter
afwriter
10/9/2017 4:31:23 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
Yeah, Youtube has to be a bane to a lot of manual laborers. Similarly to you, I have fixed multiple car problems by watching YouTube videos. I'm sure my mechanic doesn't love that. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 5:51:47 PM
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Re: A hero ain't nothing but a permutation ....
I'm not so sure YouTube replaces that many handyman jobs. But it probably keeps them more honest about pricing. YouTube videos for how-to instructions are probably the best thing about youtube's long tail.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 11:42:01 AM
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Ten thousand hours...
Is 10,000 hours of video really that much content? Obviously, YouTube has vastly more hours. But even just one Blockbuster video probably contained about that amount in VHS tapes back in the day. And I'd say a lot of that video was probably not very popular and contained quite a bit of "straight to VHS" titles.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 11:45:44 AM
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Re: Ten thousand hours...
@mhhf1ve I wanted to see if Nielsen publishes its breakdown by age. This article's graph also shows a very broad brush, just beginning at 18 rather than 16 http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/television-is-still-top-brass-but-viewing-differences-vary-with-age.html.

That difference may have to do with what is allowed by law to 16 year-olds in the UK that is restricted to only those over 18 in many states. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 12:04:16 PM
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Re: Ten thousand hours...
Demographic age brackets vary a bit from survey to survey -- especially across different countries, even when you might not think there should be many differences such as between the UK and US. But the US has its own particular set of polling standards that survey companies follow, and other countries may not have built up the same polling procedures and traditions. The US has unique age milestones for 16, 18 & 21 year olds for example.

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Ariella
Ariella
10/9/2017 12:08:10 PM
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Re: Ten thousand hours...
<The US has unique age milestones for 16, 18 & 21 year olds for example. > from a marketing segmentation perspective, that does make sense. I say that having had experience as a parent with the different age groups. 16 year-olds are at a different stage than the 18 year-olds who are already in college, for example. Also the former can't vote yet while the latter can. Due to certain law restrictions, 21 year-olds have more options and can be targeted for certain forms of marketing not open to the younger set. 

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afwriter
afwriter
10/9/2017 3:21:27 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Ten thousand hours...
I think that streaming video has completely dismantled age restrictions when it comes to video. Other than our watchful eyes there is really nothing we can do to stop a 16-year-old, or even an 8-year-old from watching a rated R movie on Netflix or Google searching any number of videos they shouldn't be watching. 

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afwriter
afwriter
10/9/2017 3:24:13 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Ten thousand hours...
I guess it would depend on how you broke down the content, If it was all in short unrelated 30 second videos it would be a lot of content, but I think 10,000 hours is about the runtime of the Lord of The Rings Trilogy Director's Cut.

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Shaunn
Shaunn
10/9/2017 3:49:02 PM
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Platinum
Pioneers are alone
I can remember the days when Netflix was the only name in the game. Channel Four has the right idea with personalization.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/9/2017 4:19:26 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
Netflix tried personalization-- and found that it's not as profitable as other content strategies -- like pointing users to original content that is tailored to its audience.

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Shaunn
Shaunn
10/10/2017 10:21:10 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
Yes, that's right, but it's on the path of discovery to more profitable ideas. Side Note: Europeans ≠ Americans; maybe this could work better for Channel Four's audience than for Netflix.

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dcawrey
dcawrey
10/10/2017 10:47:43 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
The exciting part of this technology is when our devices are assisting us with insight based off of data. It's early days for something like this, and there will be bugs. But someday this is going to be really useful tech. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/10/2017 11:43:40 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
It depends on the quality and type of content that is in their 10,000 hr library of videos. Discovery algorithms can only do so much. They're not magic. They can't turn bad shows into good ones. Unless someone has figured out a MysteryScience3000 algorithm.....

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Shaunn
Shaunn
10/15/2017 5:11:45 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
@mhhf1ve - This sort of attention on customers is how Netflix found that there are more profitable content strategies than personalization. Channel Four now has a similar opportunity and enviornment to improve on that as Netflix did. With information that shows which content is popular, they can put more focus on delivering the best content.

As far as a MysteryScience3000 algorithm goes, Netflix has been at the forefront of content streaming for years....

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
10/15/2017 6:01:36 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
I wonder how many obscure films Netflix has uncovered that might make good re-makes. Maybe there's no MysteryScience3000 algorithm, but there could be a way to tease out older films that are ripe for a re-make.

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Shaunn
Shaunn
10/15/2017 6:27:52 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
With all the remakes and Netfilix exclusives out there, I wouldn't be surprised if they started working on that sometime, if they haven't already.

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afwriter
afwriter
10/16/2017 5:43:25 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Pioneers are alone
That's an interesting question that I would like to know the answer to. I would say in a purely anecdotal capacity that these large libraries of movies are breathing new life into old classics that were lost to time and there are more than a few that I think people would love to see brought into the 21st. 

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