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dlr5288
dlr5288
11/30/2017 11:12:54 AM
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Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Good points and I agree. At the moment I don’t think any one of us can predict the next big flow of technology. All we can do is prepare in knowing that there will eventually be another big change.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
11/30/2017 7:00:55 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
I think we see this new way of "thinking" as being the way things should be done. But part of the reason for the change in the way computers operate, is the ability to do so. I think it's entirely possible that technology will again make another complete overhaul that you or I could not possibly predict at the moment. And when it does, this time of "thinking" will be just as obsolete as the last.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
9/30/2017 6:08:35 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Ms. Akkineni,

And that's the idea I'm sort of groping toward. The big change in code was from procedural languages that told the computer to look at the first element of the array, decide what to do, do it, move to the second element, etc. as opposed to those that said, "Locate all elements of the array, wherever they may be in it, that fit this definition, and write them into another array where they will fit another definition." It's a different way of thinking, one where rules tend to recede and precision of identification moves to the forefront.  just wondering how far it will go in management, now that it's everywhere in programming (where management finds so many of its metaphors!)

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
9/30/2017 5:42:46 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
@John. B:

I don't disagree a thing from your comment.

What i would say is we use to refer old doc as 'Architecture model' that outlines system / data flows,. In today's world as you indicated where coding is becoming negligible, there still is need for process rules, which is nothing but the rule book. To sum it up, we surely need a document explaining process / rules.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
9/30/2017 5:22:11 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Ms. Akkineni,

I wonder if the reason why we all tend to think rule based systems have been well-ordered and are at least on the way to being well-run is because business has been computerizing for sixty or more years now, and until very recently, if you wanted a computer to do something, you wrote a set of rules and procedures for it. Thus the best "workers" business had available tended to respond well to texts of rules and procedures (in fact that was all they responded to).  But as code becomes less and less procedure-driven, and more and more definition-driven (that's what the object-oriented revolution is all about), I wonder if a younger generation of managers will find it equally "obvious" that what you need is a really good, specific, nuanced set of actionable definitions, and it will be just as obvious to the managers of 2067 that a well-run enterprise begins with a carefully thought out dictionary as it is to us that it begins with a carefully thought out rulebook.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
9/30/2017 1:59:58 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
@faryl:

Very well explained. Having basic architecture model in an entreprise is the most basic requirement for any company. Unless the company is not established, that has been a norm in most companies.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
9/30/2017 1:53:16 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Establishing guidelines is always a good approach. Atleast there is something to look for and follow. As we proceed there is always chance to tweak guidelines to reflext current trends.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
9/30/2017 1:49:10 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Any rule based approach is certainly good way to start with when compared to proceeding with not much of a direction. So this should surely help out.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
9/28/2017 9:28:57 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
Faryl,

Absolutely. Decisions about what sits where, where things come to it from, what happens to them when they get there, and where it sends its things, if made right the first time, are both durable and flexible; decisions about what is "state of the art" or "best practices" are outdated faster than your lap disappears when you stand up.

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faryl
faryl
9/28/2017 6:30:30 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big Rules for Transformation
I bet this one gets missed a lot: "Properly defined architectures survive almost everything. A properly defined architecture does not include specific technologies. You can break things apart and still get to the final goal." Strikes me as the type of thing where it's often non-existent or too granular. Also probably a good exercise for a company to do even if they aren't planning any upcoming changes to their architecture, to help identify potential risks & unnecessary redundancies.

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