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dlr5288
dlr5288
8/30/2017 1:22:58 PM
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Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
I agree! We're giving all this money, but for what? Some times it's not explained at all and just expected.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
8/29/2017 8:39:47 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
@Ariella - It wouldn't surprise me at all if the reason for all the insurance shenanigans is the intent to make more money. Because you're right, a lot of people don't question their charges. Much less try to appeal them. 

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afwriter
afwriter
8/25/2017 4:47:33 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
I'm not too familiar with it, I have just seen it advertised. I'm guessing that you have to set up your favorite order and that is what you would get every time with no modifications. 

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Ariella
Ariella
8/25/2017 10:24:31 AM
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Author
Re: Automate some not all
@elizabethv There was a time, I was naive and thought that whatever bills came had to be paid. Then I realized that people mess up on the doctor's end and on the insurance ends. It happens so very often that I suspect some of it is by design -- a way to hit the patients up for more money -- rather than mere error. Just the latest example: I took two kids in for a well checkup yesterday. As I left, the billing person told me aI had a balance due of $7.91 a piece from last year. I said that didn't make sense, as well visits are covered 100% under preventive care. She just went by what she saw that showed a bill of $20 sent to the insurance, payment of $12.01, leaving that balance. What I think happened is that the somoene erred in showing it as a balance billable to the patient rather than as the amount that is allowed and paid by insurance. The me of 7 years back would have just paid it as it is not so much. But having been through this kind of thing so many times, I said, it must be wrong and called theinsurance company to have them go over it so that the doctor's office would not show that the balance was billable.

Anyway, that's very small fry compared to the many thousands of dollars that had been billed and then denied and then appealed over and over and over and over and over (no exaggeration here) for the amounts billed for my son's surgery. It took about a year to get that resolved. This is why having people fully insured doesn't solve the problems of avoiding unexpected medical bills. There are kinds of shenanigans pulled by both the insurance companies and the health providers to try to maximize their own profits. I'm stil amazed that not only did the PA (not even a full doctor) bill over $8K a pop for each in-hospital visit of about 5 minutes but that the insurance actually paid it each time -- except for once, which is why we had to go through so many appeals.

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
8/25/2017 8:51:16 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
@Ariella - I kind of prefer a mix of automation and human intervention. I'm not sure where I fall on the "younger generation" spectrum though. I don't even really identify as a Millenial, though my birth year puts me there. Still, I'll take text messaging and emails over phone calls anyday. In fact I have to spend several days siking myself up to even make a phone call anymore (to anyone that isn't family.) Everyone who knows me knows I don't answer the phone. I have stared at my ringing phone, waiting for it to stop so I can text message the person and ask what they need. Butat the same time, my sons hospital bill came in, for his birth several months ago. Insurance denied the charge. There was a mix up with his DOB and start of his insurance. (They knew I had a scheduled c-section on the 14th and for whatever reason decided that was when they were starting his insurance, but my water broke on the 9th and he was delievered on the 10th, so they weren't paying any bills from the 10th to the 14th. Because babies apparently follow planned timelines in their world?) It literally took me two months, and threats of sending the bill to collections and calling the hospital to talk to a customer relations specialist. All because the hospital billing department has a policy to not call insurance companies. So I had phone call after phone call of the billing department wanting me to call the insurance company and vice versa. And it was exhausting, and I am confident could have been solved if they would have just talked to EACH OTHER instead of relying on computers. :-/

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DHagar
DHagar
8/21/2017 5:16:05 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
@dcawrey, I see it the same way!  It already exists with cognitive computing - where automation replaces coding.

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Ariella
Ariella
8/17/2017 6:24:06 PM
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Author
Re: Automate some not all
@afwriter is there one for each type, or do you have to write in specifications for toppings, etc.?

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afwriter
afwriter
8/17/2017 5:33:58 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
I was going to make the point that you can't use emojis with automation yet then I remembered that you can order a pizza from Dominos with an emoji.

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dcawrey
dcawrey
8/16/2017 11:52:04 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Automate some not all
Software is eating everything up - and that process includes automation. 

Because we're getting so adept at software development these days, automation to me just seems like the next wave of processes to take hold. 

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Ariella
Ariella
8/16/2017 8:51:32 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Automate some not all
@afwriter same here! The worst are the ones in which one menu just leads to another and then another like a set of nesting dolls. Sometimes even after all that, you don't get an option to choose a person, though the system will sometimes allow you to hold for one after you've gotten to the lst menu selection.

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