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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
8/8/2017 7:50:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
always 30 years in the future.. until now?
Strong AI used to be a "future technology" that was always 30 years away.. like nuclear fusion energy tech still is. But it looks like it might be becoming more practical for robotics and other software applications... and maybe take over the world, if it improves as fast as hardware has. 

Hopefully, we'll have benevolent AI... and not the kind that will extinguish us (or let us extinguish ourselves).

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Ariella
Ariella
8/9/2017 3:05:10 PM
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Author
Re: always 30 years in the future.. until now?
@mhhf1ve that depends on whether your views are more in sync with Elon Musk or with Mark Zuckerberg.

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afwriter
afwriter
8/9/2017 4:30:41 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: always 30 years in the future.. until now?
@mhhf1ve what do you mean by "take over the world"? Haha. Seriously though, I agree that this is a fascinating time and I like the analogy that it has always been 30 years into the future until now. 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/9/2017 1:28:20 AM
User Rank
Platinum
AI: Seizing the Prize
New jobs created by AI would probably be jobs that have to do with AI, which would be mostly technology jobs. Other service jobs would fall by the wayside. Over the years, I've seen retail clerks in supermarkets, etc ... diminish, and even fewer bank tellers. I don't know what they've been replaced with (well maybe self-scanning guns in supermarkets), but it doesn't improve things when there are long lines.

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Ariella
Ariella
8/9/2017 2:54:12 PM
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Author
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
My thoughts exactly @srulofo. The new jobs created will require advanced technical skills and so will not be open to many of the people displaced by automation.

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afwriter
afwriter
8/9/2017 4:33:17 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
There will probably be a few unskilled repair and maintenance jobs but for the most part, it will probably be writing software, debugging, etc. There is also the initial manufacturing of parts that could be considered unskilled labor.

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Ariella
Ariella
8/10/2017 8:41:44 AM
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Author
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@afwriter I consider repair and maintenance to be skilled work. Obviously, yes, even if IoT signals let people know which machines need that, someone will have to tend to it. The jobs more likley to be lost are those involving the simpler labor of moving things around a warehouse or assembling parts in a factory.

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Shaunn
Shaunn
8/10/2017 6:54:12 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@Ariella I agree. Not only would repairs have to be done by a skilled worker, but the machines (robots or unmoving boxes, mostly robots) themselves would have to be configured to work in a particular enviornment as well as be installed for use in that enviornment.

The biggest concern of AI, I think, would be whether or not businesses can find skilled workers with the needed qualifications to use AI well, just as employers are having trouble finding properly qualified IoT proffessionals and problems with IoT security.

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afwriter
afwriter
8/9/2017 4:34:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
"well maybe self-scanning guns in supermarkets"

and they still have a human there to help when the gun goes wonky.

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/9/2017 5:30:10 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@afwriter True. And those scanning guns go "wonky" a lot. They have technical problems just as you're finishing your entire order, forcing you to scan everything at the counter anyway. Also, I always get behind a 100-year-old when I'm in a hurry who thought they knew how to work the gun, but did not.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
8/11/2017 9:38:30 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@srufolo1 - I saw a meme I think once, that if they could replace menial jobs like grocery store clerks and fast food workers with machines, they would have already done it. And I think that's largely true. No matter how good AI gets, while it may be able to replace a few people, I really can't see their ability to completely replace those roles. I have 10 years (really bragging here) fast food experience on my resume. There is a lot of critical thought necessary to be able to do those jobs well (please note the WELL.) And dealing with customer complaints for screw ups (I was management for 8 of those 10 years) is not something that would work if all your employees are robots. 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/11/2017 9:54:53 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@elizabethv First, I am impressed with your fast food experience and your knowledge of technology. I agree. What can replace customer complaints, etc ... However, I think that's what we are working toward. In another 100 years, robots will be programmed to do all that. Maybe not on a human level emotionally. But maybe they'll, for instance, know how to replae the order that was not unacceptable and replace it with something that satisfies the customer. But by then we'll probably be eating Soylent Green anyway.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
8/16/2017 8:21:30 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@srufolo1 - Lol, my husband says we can never eat at Sonic Drive-In because I always have to comment on something. The other part of robots making people happy would come into play with the specificity some customers have. I remember a customer that sent their burger back 3 times because they asked for extra pickles, and each time he wanted more pickles. So even us humans ended up having a hard time meeting his demand of extra pickles. (In the end he was literally satisfied with an entire handful of pickles on his burger, and the cook had big hands. How that was satisfying, I'll never know. But he stopped complaining after that.)

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dcawrey
dcawrey
8/16/2017 12:22:55 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
AI is such a double edge sword. On on hand, the potential for AI is immense. However, I think we often take too lightly the fact that machines taking over could actually happen. Skynet isn't fiction for long. 

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/22/2017 10:14:43 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
That's a heck of a lot of pickles. Someone who likes that many pickles should bring their own jar of them. A robot could be trained for extra pickles, but how much is extra? I'll take some burger with my pickles!

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faryl
faryl
8/22/2017 3:34:32 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@elizabethv I agree. I would think the cost to completely replace humans with machines for jobs like you mention in the fast food industry would outweigh the benefits gained. Kitchens would need to be reconfigured not only for the necessary computing machinery to run the AI, but also for the mechanical functionality involved in automating the food prep process. Completely eliminating humans would mean implementing machinery to handle the hand-off of the prepared food to the customer. Otherwise, you still need employees to perform that function; since companies have to pay at least a minimum wage, it strikes me that there is a point where AI & automation become added costs that outweigh the benefits they might provide. Even if it could all be done - companies would need to then employ skilled programmers & mechanics for operation, maintenance, & repairs. All of this while probably compromising customer satisfaction, because the likelihood of something like that running seamlessly without a need for human assistance seems rather unlikely in practical terms.

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faryl
faryl
8/22/2017 3:20:20 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
I think there's a tendency to conflate "AI" and automation. Using artificial intelligence doesn't necessarily mean that jobs performed by humans will be done by machines instead - AI can be incorporated into the tools/machines/processes that humans are using. For example, using AI to help determine inventory won't replace the people needed to approve the orders, make the payments, pack & transport the product, and stock it on the shelves - but it could be used to help predict market demand, cost of materials, more granular transportation costs (e.g., accounting for changing costs of fuel, seasonal impacts on transit time, etc.) and other variables that could impact the bottom line.

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/22/2017 10:18:56 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@faryl You're right, except I think I saw something on TV where warehouses were using robots to stock the shelves. But they can't take the place of everything humans do.

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faryl
faryl
8/31/2017 7:41:00 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@srufalo1 They can't love :)

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srufolo1
srufolo1
8/31/2017 10:05:26 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AI: Seizing the Prize
@faryl One day the term "mixed marriage" may very well mean the union between a robot and a human!

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clrmoney
clrmoney
8/9/2017 7:26:14 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Less Investment for AI
Trillions on AI I don't think she even AI is very interesting but I know they have o be better alternative ways for AI for us and them.

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