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DHagar
DHagar
5/31/2017 4:36:39 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
@dir5288, that's the only way we will stay ahead of the ever-growing threats and vulnerabilities.  We will never control and stop them, but can continue to build barriers that result in greater protection and/or alerts so we can take appropriate measures.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
5/30/2017 11:20:30 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
Exactly! It's true, there needs to be a security system for the Cloud that protects against all different types of programs and devices. Not just certain ones.

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DHagar
DHagar
5/30/2017 7:58:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
@dir5288 - I think it will.  And it truly requires a more complex design that more effectively addresses the realities of security for a multi-faceted systems - which is today's environment.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
5/30/2017 1:46:12 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
I definitely hope so! I'm glad that they're providing more layers of security with the Cloud. I'm hoping it makes a clear improvement!

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DHagar
DHagar
5/1/2017 6:39:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
@dir5288, I think the platforms that are now behind most of the clouds are beginning to address this issue and provide new layers of security that will be comparable - or even be at a higher level going forward.

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freehe
freehe
4/30/2017 8:46:44 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
@dcawrey, I agree. I am concerned about that as well. IoT is suge a huge giant it will be hard to find a comprehensive solution for all aspects of IoT but if they can create smaller solutions for specific parts of IoT that will definitely help.

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freehe
freehe
4/30/2017 8:45:22 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Security
Glad to know AT&T is concerned about security.

"Sending your data over the open Internet is like driving where you don't know what you may encounter along the way; like delays due to congestion or security threats like DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service.) In contrast, NetBond offers what amounts to your own private lane on a private freeway. It allows your data to breeze through unharmed and unhampered by latency issues or jitter. It's also flexible and agile, so that it automatically scales up bandwidth to accommodate peak traffic loads."

It is great that they have a plan to address security issues in the cloud because this is a huge fear of many companies using public and private clouds.

This is exciting.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/29/2017 9:41:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
Ariella,

In the part of game theory that looks at strategy, this is known as controlling the access. It works a bit like that space gate in Rogue One -- the whole planet is under some kind of shield that you can only enter through one locked portal where you're supposed to apply for access.

Essentially it's a matter of putting your defenses farther away so that you don't have to disrupt your home ground. For example, back before the antitrust decisions, movie studios owned most of the movie theaters in the US and thus made it fairly tough for small independent producers to grow into major competitiors. RCA/NBC tried to do something very similar.  Globally, it's the basis of the American participation in NATO -- doing all the fighting overseas ("fighting to the last European") worked so well for us in the last two world wars (in terms of not getting bombed or invaded) that we decided to do it in all our world wars.  It's similarly the reason England has always tried to prevent any large power from controlling the Rhine delta (logical invasion route) and at one time tried to have bases at all the global choke points for ships (Gibraltar, Singapore, etc.)  It's why for a long time Boeing, McDoug, Airbus, etc. tried to keep all the high-skilled aviation machinists in the US or Europe (to avoid the risk of an Asian entrant into the airliner business that is their most dependable revenue source).

The best place to locate security is a point the opposition can't bypass that is actually remote from your core business/facility etc.  I think that's what NetBond is trying to offer: you get an ultrafast burstable single link for your VPN into the cloud, and AT&T promises it will be a very hard target, and thus your vulnerable spot is far away and armored up.

I think.  Because honestly, looking at their web page, it could also just be a fast port with good flexibility and security.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/29/2017 9:26:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
faryl,

I'd like to see more details too; NetBond sounds great but oddly enough, the "so what is it, exactly" sentence seems to be missing. On the ATT homepage for it, it is explained as "AT&T NetBond® for Cloud enables you to connect, or "bond," your AT&T virtual private network (VPN) to cloud providers of your choice."  So if I'm getting this right, your internal/local intranet talks only to your VPN (which apparently must be an AT&T VPN). Your VPN then talks to the rest of the cloud via a secure, high-capacity channel called NetBond.

I think.

Pretty clearly if you have any direct connections from your intranet to other companies/cloud facilities, you have a potentially open backdoor, so it only solves security if you're willing to make it your one connection going out.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
4/29/2017 1:41:30 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: AT&T Cloud concerns
Exactly! And the Cloud is so useful. If the security was made stronger and more dependable it would be used by so many more people/companies.

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