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faryl
faryl
10/25/2016 10:34:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Spoilers
The quality of TV shows definitely plays a big part there. Years ago, an actor would get their *start* on television in an effort to "break into movies"... "ending up" on TV was considered a step down. Now actors view TV as comparable to movies, with the added benefit of a more predictable schedule.

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faryl
faryl
10/25/2016 10:25:33 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Spoilers
Right? It seems such an odd thing to lie about. Setting aside the fact that adults feel so strong a need for their coworkers to think they're cool; with the way people binge-watch shows, wait for them to be on Netflix after the season ends, "saving up" episodes to watch on the weekend, plus the sheer number of shows out there, a simple "haven't seen that yet" would seem to suffice.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
10/24/2016 4:39:13 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Spoilers
@JohnBarnes: 

"So a certain amount of TV watching used to be driven by the concern that you might miss something you'd love; now, it's driven only by the actural desire to consume, and of course that nets out to less." 

 

That is a great point!! People used to watch a show when it was their only opportunity to watch it. Now people have the option of watching what they want when it's convenient for them. You don't have to be controlled by possibily missing out on the one thing everyone will be tlaking about tomorrow. I have to wonder if the ratings of of the series finale of M*A*S*H would have been close to what they were if people would have had the same options at that time. Heck the first showing of the series premiere of The Walking Dead was hours ago, and I'm just now watching it. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/23/2016 2:21:57 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Spoilers
This occasioned a second thought: Minimax regret is famously a great decision maker for low-cost precautions that prevent big disasters -- installing smoke detectors, taking an extra second to make sure you didn't leave the oven on, checking where the toddler is one more time, forming any safety habit really. It's also a perfectly terrible way to conduct a business in any high-stakes all-or-nothing sort of industry, where expected value is a much better way.

There's probably a largish study that could be done and would be useful about Minimax v. Expected Value in people's entertainment choices. At a guess, which basic rule is the underlying one probably varies a lot by demographic.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
10/23/2016 2:21:38 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Spoilers
Joe,

And the Minimax Regret Principle (which brings us back to the watercooler): many decisions are made by minimizing the maximum regret you are likely to feel in the future. If everyone is talking about that great episode of THE REAL GRAVE ROBBERS OF SCARSDALE at the watercooler tomorrow, and you can't because you decided you needed some extra sleep, if you are a social enough creature, that possible pain is greater than the possible pain of saying, "I stayed up for that?" So you stay up, minimizing your maximum regret.

 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
10/22/2016 4:45:41 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Spoilers
> Yes, people attention spans are getting shorter--but the need for deep engaging analysis should be at the heart of transformaiton--right?

Huh?  Are you still talking about that?

 

;)

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
10/22/2016 4:44:23 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Spoilers
@John: Interesting examples.

Over the years, It's a Wonderful Life has gone from one of my favorite films to one I hate.  Now that I'm an adult, I'm firmly of the opinion that Jimmy Stewart's character and his brother should have lost their banking licenses and been jailed for bank fraud -- and that Potter was the real good guy.  As for Mr. Holland's Opus -- a fine film, a tear-jerker, but when you step away and think about it, the guy has one really nice moment where he feels like his life has had meaning -- and then, undoubtedly, after the end credits roll, his life gradually goes back to drudgery and dissatisfaction, as before.

(I am unfamiliar with the other two you mentioned on that list.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
10/22/2016 4:40:42 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: So confused...
I fell out of The Wire at the Season 2 premiere.  Since then, it's been on my "I'll get around to watching that again...someday" list.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
10/22/2016 4:39:27 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Spoilers
@John: There's also Cialdini's Law of Scarcity.  When we had to watch a show at a specific time and date, it was more important to watch.  Now that we can watch it any ol' time., we de-prioritize such watching.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
10/22/2016 4:35:41 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Spoilers
@vnewman: Yeah, but that's work.  If somebody's too lazy to watch a TV show, then they're probably not going to go through all of that trouble.  ;)

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