Contributors   |   Messages   |   Polls   |   Resources   |  
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
vnewman
vnewman
8/10/2016 1:27:08 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
The purchase makes sense - so it doesn't surprise me.  These funds aren't actually cash on-hand however - the reserves are overseas and Apple doesn't plan to bring any cash back here to avoid the tax hit.  The rest is in long-term marketable securities, which means Apple has those funds committed for a least a year.  So they will borrow to make this deal happen.

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
8/10/2016 8:39:33 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
@JohnBarnes I had recalled that, though Apple may be in a class of its own, as it is reportedly sitting on over $230 billion.

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
8/10/2016 8:37:47 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@JohnBarnes yes, but Apple has a lot of room with that. There's some argument about the figure, but according to what I could find, it is sitting on over $230 billion in cash.  So even if it loses a hundred billion (a huge sum us mere mortals) it still has more than that amount left over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
8/10/2016 8:37:28 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

@JohnBarnes yes, but Apple has a lot of room with that. There's some argument about the figure, but according to what I could find, it is sitting on over $230 billion in cash.  So even if it loses a hundred billion (a huge sum us mere mortals) it still has more than that amount left over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50%
50%
JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
8/10/2016 7:17:48 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
Ariella,

And less fliply, I suspect that Apple is one of the first companies to really figure out the commercial benefits of the "reverse Turing effect", i.e. that AI leads to machines that are better at training humans, thus making the humans easier to serve/extract money from.

(A classic example is something a friend of mine has been doing research on: the history of "how to study" or "how to do well in school" books. There's a noticeable change in the books, apparently, after multiple choice questions become widespread; students are advised to pick out just enough to be able to reject wrong answers. In the age of MOOCs and online, it is so reassuring to know that so many workers can reject most of the wrong choices, and you're fine as long as the right one is already in there ....)

Similarly, there's apparently been some considerable improvement in the performance of search engines that is attributable to frequent users becoming better at writing searches.

50%
50%
JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
8/10/2016 7:11:05 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
Still, as Everett Dirksen remarked while he was in the Senate, a billion here, a billion there, pretty soon you're talking about real money.

50%
50%
DHagar
DHagar
8/9/2016 7:58:02 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apple Al Turi
@clrmoney, and one wonders if Apple is considering shifting focus to "intelligent" services in the future, with less emphasis on products?

50%
50%
DHagar
DHagar
8/9/2016 7:56:16 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
@Joe Stanganelli, that sounds like another "winning" cartoon caption to me!

50%
50%
clrmoney
clrmoney
8/9/2016 11:19:32 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Apple Al Turi
They should buy thiis machine for AI so this wil be a great idea so lets see how it turns out.

50%
50%
Ariella
Ariella
8/9/2016 8:37:03 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Obvious marketing, amirite?
Sounds like Apple's going on an AI shopping spree. A couple of hundred million here and there, though is all small change to a company sitting on billions. 

50%
50%
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Latest Articles
Italy's 5G auction could exceed a government target of raising 2.5 billion ($2.9 billion) after attracting interest from companies outside the mobile market.
The emerging-markets operator is focusing on the humdrum business of connectivity and keeping quiet about some of its ill-fated 'digitalization' efforts.
Three UK has picked Huawei over existing radio access network suppliers Nokia and Samsung to build its 5G network.
Vendor says that it's its biggest 5G deal to date.
Verizon skates where the puck is going by waiting for standards-based 5G devices to launch its mobile service in 2019.
On-the-Air Thursdays Digital Audio
Orange has been one of the leading proponents of SDN and NFV. In this Telco Transformation radio show, Orange's John Isch provides some perspective on his company's NFV/SDN journey.
Special Huawei Video
10/16/2017
Huawei Network Transformation Seminar
The adoption of virtualization technology and cloud architectures by telecom network operators is now well underway but there is still a long way to go before the transition to an era of Network Functions Cloudification (NFC) is complete.
Video
The Small Cell Forum's CEO Sue Monahan says that small cells will be crucial for indoor 5G coverage, but challenges around business models, siting ...
People, strategy, a strong technology roadmap and new business processes are the key underpinnings of Telstra's digital transformation, COO Robyn ...
Eric Bozich, vice president of products and marketing at CenturyLink, talks about the challenges and opportunities of integrating Level 3 into ...
Epsilon's Mark Daley, director of digital strategy and business development, talks about digital transformation from a wholesale service provider ...
Bill Walker, CenturyLink's director of network architecture, shares his insights on why training isn't enough for IT employees and traditional ...
All Videos
Telco Transformation
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS
Copyright © 2019 Light Reading, part of Informa Tech,
a division of Informa PLC. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Terms of Use
in partnership with